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No-Butter Lemon Curd

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No-Butter Lemon Curd

This no-butter lemon curd is better-for-you, yet just as rich and puckery as the traditional treat. Learn where lemon curd comes from, how to make it, and enjoy it from breakfast to dessert!

No-Butter Lemon Curd, with Dairy-Free Option // FoodNouveau.com

This post contains affiliate links. Full disclosure is at the bottom of the article.


Lemon curd is one of my favorite citrus condiments. Everything about it makes me happy: its bright yellow color, its zippy, puckery flavor, and the fact that you can enjoy it from breakfast to dessert. 

A bit of lemon curd history: Lemon curd is a creamy fruit spread usually made with egg yolks, butter, sugar, lemon juice, and lemon zest. It’s an English condiment that dates back to the 19th century. Lemon curd was traditionally (and is still now) served with afternoon tea as an alternative to jams with scones, bread, and cake. It can also be used to fill pastries and tarts.

After making traditional lemon curd for years, I started experimenting with different variations to avoid using the butter usually required in traditional recipes (making it friendlier for my lactose-intolerant belly). After perfecting this completely butter-less lemon curd, I realized I didn’t miss the traditional, butter-laden variety at all. Everyone who tasted loved it too, not noticing the lack of extra calories—so I’ve never looked back.

This no-butter lemon curd is now my go-to lemon curd recipe. The use of a little cornstarch helps achieve the right silky consistency, and the addition of just a little cream leaves room for a slightly puckery taste—the hallmark of the bright condiment.

I always keep a jar of this no-butter lemon curd in the fridge and use it on anything and everything, from breakfast to dessert. I’m addicted, you see, and I think you’ll quickly become so, too.

No-Butter Lemon Curd, with Dairy-Free Option // FoodNouveau.com

Now, if you’re not very familiar with the condiment, here’s a bit of background information on why lemon curd is so delightful, and some helpful tips to learn how to make it at home.

Why is lemon curd called a “curd”?

In 19th century England, lemon “curd” was exactly that: curds were created by mixing acidic lemon juice into cream, which was then strained from the dairy whey through a cheesecloth. 

Over time, butter, eggs, and sugar replaced the cream to create the rich, velvety spread we know today. Modern lemon curd is made just like a custard, which is liquid (lemon juice) thickened by eggs.

What ingredients are used to make traditional lemon curd?

Traditional lemon curd is made with butter, eggs, and lemon juice. In traditional lemon curd, butter is used both as a thickener and to create a richer mouthfeel and flavor. In my no-butter lemon curd recipe, I achieve the same velvety texture with a spoonful of cornstarch and a bit of heavy cream. This allows me to completely leave the butter out of the equation, creating a better-for-you condiment in the process.

Can you add more sugar to lemon curd?

Lemon curd is meant to walk that fine line between too-acidic and just-sweet-enough. That said, the sweetness levels of lemons vary. I do understand that some people might enjoy the aromatic quality of lemon curd but not its puckery acidity. You can add up to 2 tbsp (24 g) granulated sugar to this no-butter lemon curd recipe to round off its edges.

But if you are looking for a sweeter, less acidic citrus curd, I recommend using Meyer lemons, which are much sweeter than regular lemons, or swapping in a bit of orange, mandarin, or clementine juice for part of the lemon juice required in the recipe. This will naturally sweeten the curd without adding more sugar.

Refer to my citrus fruit juice to sugar ratios, below, for more information about the different citrus fruits you can use to make curds and the associated amounts of sugar you should use to make them.

Squeezing lemon juice to make lemon curd // FoodNouveau.com

How long can I store no-butter lemon curd?

You can refrigerate no-butter lemon curd in an airtight jar for up to 5 days.

Can I freeze no-butter lemon curd?

You can’t freeze this no-butter lemon curd. This curd is cooked like a pastry cream that is stabilized with cornstarch. If you freeze no-butter lemon curd, it will thaw to a completely different texture. That rich, smooth texture will be replaced by a yucky, grainy one because the fats and proteins will have separated during the freezing/thawing process. That silky smooth texture you want for your pastries will be gone. This is not something you can fix. So please, do not freeze this no-butter lemon curd!

Can I use other citrus fruits to make lemon curd? 

Of course, you can! You can use any citrus fruit to make curd. My favorite alternatives are clementines and mandarins because they’re so aromatic! Of course, oranges are much sweeter than lemons, so if you’re swapping oranges for lemons, you’ll need to adjust the sugar quantity used in the curd, but also expect a much tamer, sweeter condiment. Those who specifically love the tartness of lemon curd will truly enjoy using limes or grapefruit! You can also mix citrus fruits and make curd with lemons and clementines, for example.

Refer to my list of fruit juice to sugar ratios below to see the different varieties of curds you can make.

Citrus curds made with different citrus varieties // FoodNouveau.com
Photo above from my cookbook Simply Citrus.

Approximate citrus fruit juice to sugar ratios to make citrus curds

If you’re swapping out lemons to use other varieties of citrus fruits in this no-butter lemon curd recipe, you’ll need to adjust the sugar content. I’ve made nearly every variety of citrus curds, so here are the citrus fruit juice to sugar ratios I’ve created.

The number of citrus fruits indicated below should provide the amount of juice required in the recipe. Of course, the juiciness of citrus fruits varies widely according to provenance and season, so whichever citrus fruits you use, make sure to always reach the total amount of 1/2 cup (125 ml) strained juice required in the recipe.

  • 1 grapefruit, 4 lemons, 6 limes, or 18-24 key limes: use 1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar
  • 6 Meyer lemons: use 1/3 cup (70 g) granulated sugar
  • 3 oranges (blood, Cara Cara, or Navel) or 8 mandarins or clementines: use 1/4 cup (50 g) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) bottled yuzu juice: use 1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar

Any citrus fruit can be used to make citrus curds // FoodNouveau.com
Photo above from my cookbook Simply Citrus.

Delightful ideas to use and serve lemon curd 

You can also quite simply enjoy no-butter lemon curd straight out of the jar, by the spoonful! However you choose to serve lemon curd, you can’t go wrong with this wonderfully versatile condiment.

Layered cake with lemon curd as a filling // FoodNouveau.com

Citrus Desserts Cookbook

Love zesty, citrus-centric dessert recipes? Then you’ll love my Citrus Desserts Cookbook! Filled with colorful, irresistible meticulously tested dessert recipes—including cakes, tarts, breakfast treats, and delicious bars, spoonable treats, and candies—Citrus Desserts features mouthwatering photography, countless clever tips, and variation ideas to make the recipes as versatile as possible. LEARN MORE

Citrus Desserts: Sweet & Zesty Treats to Brighten Up Your Meals, an eBook by Marie Asselin, Award-Winning Author of FoodNouveau.com

 
No-Butter Lemon Curd, with Dairy-Free Option // FoodNouveau.com

No-Butter Lemon Curd Recipe

This no-butter lemon curd is better-for-you, yet just as rich and puckery as the traditional treat. Learn where lemon curd comes from, how to make it, and enjoy it from breakfast to dessert!
Prep Time:5 mins
Cook Time:15 mins
Cooling Time:3 hrs
Servings 2 cups (500 ml)
Author Marie Asselin (FoodNouveau.com)

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp cornstarch
  • 1 tbsp water
  • ¾ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 4 lemons)
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • cup heavy cream (35% m.f., see note, below, for a dairy-free alternative)

Instructions

  • In a small bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in the water. Set aside.
  • In a saucepan set over medium heat, whisk the lemon juice and sugar together until the sugar is completely dissolved (the mixture doesn’t need to boil.) Remove from the heat and let cool until warm. In a small bowl, whisk the eggs together, and gradually pour into the lemon-sugar syrup, whisking constantly to incorporate. Place the saucepan back over medium heat. Add the cornstarch mixture and whisk to incorporate.
  • Continue whisking until the mixture is thick like a custard or a soft pudding (make sure to whisk constantly so the mixture doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan and burn.) Remove from the heat. Whisk in the regular heavy cream. If you're expecting a brighter yellow hue, feel free to add a drop of yellow food coloring, but I prefer my lemon curd to retain its natural soft yellow shade.
  • STORAGE: Transfer to an airtight jar and refrigerate until completely cold. The lemon curd will keep for up to a week.
  • MAKE IT LACTOSE FREE OR DAIRY-FREE: Substitute lactose-free heavy cream or soy cream for the regular heavy cream.

Notes

Approximate citrus juice to sugar ratios to make citrus curds
The number of citrus fruits indicated below should provide the amount of juice required in the recipe. Since the juiciness of citrus fruits varies widely according to provenance and season, whichever citrus fruits you use, simply make sure to always reach the total amount of 1/2 cup (125 ml) strained juice required in the recipe.
  • 1 grapefruit, 4 lemons, 6 limes, or 18-24 key limes: use 1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar
  • 6 Meyer lemons: use 1/3 cup (70 g) granulated sugar
  • 3 oranges (blood, Cara Cara, or Navel) or 8 mandarins or clementines: use 1/4 cup (50 g) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) bottled yuzu juice: use 1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar

Did you make this?

Tell me how you liked it! Leave a comment or take a picture and tag it with @foodnouveau on Instagram.

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If you click on an affiliate link, I may earn advertising or referral fees if you make a purchase through such links, at no extra cost to you. This helps me creating new content for the blog–so thank you! Learn more about advertising on this site by reading my Disclosure Policy.

Author: Marie Asselin

Prep Time: 5 mins
Cook Time: 15 mins
Cooling Time: 3 hrs

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  1. 5 stars
    That’s just great! I’ve been looking for a recipe for a while. I could’t find any commercial lemon card. Now, I’m so happy to use this in cakes and other pastries.

  2. 5 stars
    I LOVE lemon curd and I love that this one is made without butter. It’s just as creamy and rich…such a wonderful addition to so many dishes!

  3. 5 stars
    I love lemon curd but I’ve never made it at home. I’m glad I found this recipe, it was really fun to make and way easier than I thought it would be!

  4. This fresh, bright lemon curd is going to be the perfect addition to the lavender cake I’m baking this weekend. It looks so good I can almost taste it now. Can’t wait!

  5. 5 stars
    I love the color of lemon curd too – so pretty! Lemon curd is a fan favorite at our house! Will have to give this recipe a try soon!

  6. 5 stars
    How very clever Marie. I’ll never pass up a spoon full of lemon curd. It’s so bright and citrusy. This is something I would love to eat with scones or slathered on toast.

  7. 5 stars
    I made this no-butter lemon curd to add to a tea time gift basket for a lactose-intolerant friend who lost her furbaby. She raved about how good it was, so I was sure to share the recipe. Great job!

  8. 5 stars
    I am a lemon lover to the core. I can eat lemon curd off the spoon (and do).
    So many delicious ways to enjoy this tasty lemon recipe.

  9. 5 stars
    I cannot get ENOUGH OF THIS!! Thank you so much! I’ve already filled cake layers and have even made it to give out as gifts! Everyone loves it so much because they can use it for whatever they want! It’s absolutely beautiful too.